Loudon Wainwright III – Tickets – World Cafe Live Philadelphia – Philadelphia, PA – November 29th, 2017

Loudon Wainwright III

Loudon Wainwright III

Lucy Wainwright Roche

Wed · November 29, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

World Cafe Live Philadelphia

$35 ADV - $38 DOS + Fees

Mezzanine tickets are subject to a premium service fee that will be applied at checkout.

Loudon Wainwright III
Loudon Wainwright III
Haven’t Got the Blues (Yet)--or HGTB(Y), for short—is the 26th album in the long and illustrious career of Loudon Wainwright III.

It follows his acclaimed Older Than My Old Man Now album—“my death n’ decay opus,” as Wainwright calls it, and 2010’s Grammy-winning High Wide & Handsome.

In HGTB(Y) he broadens his scope with a 14-song, genre-bounding set (“eclectricity,” he calls it) dealing with varied subject matter including depression, drinking, senior citizenship, gun control, heartbreak, pet ownership and New York City’s arcane practice of alternate side-of-the-street parking.

Uproariously rocking lead track “Brand New Dance,” which evokes The Big Bopper’s classic “Chantilly Lace,” is “me moaning and groaning about the horror and embarrassment of personal physical diminishment in the wider context of the world in which we live today,” Wainwright states.

Continuing this theme, “The Morgue,” which Judd Apatow originally commissioned for Wainwright’s dysfunctional dad character to sing to Adam Sandler in an episode of Undeclared, finds “death and decay meeting shit love,” he says.

Likewise, “Harlan County” was written as a theme song for the TV show Justified, and also like “The Morgue,” was rejected. Wainwright’s version on HGTB(Y), however, features the beautiful vocal harmonies of singer-songwriter Aoife O’Donovan. The backup vocals of Wainwright’s daughter Martha, meanwhile, appropriately grace “I Knew Your Mother.”

Other cuts of special Wainwright interest include “Man & Dog,” which was motivated by his dog Harry (the inspiration of other Wainwright ditties, including, he says, his yet-to-be-recorded “Puppy Hate”), and “Spaced,” a klezmer/Balkan gypsy-styled look at that alternate street parking theme. He takes a typically topical turn on “God & Nature” (“A bit of Episcopalian gospel composed after watching the 2012 Vice Presidential Debates”) and his new seasonal favorite, “I’ll Be Killing You This Christmas.”

Wainwright notes that he toyed with the idea of calling the album Town & Country, then saw the cover photo of the famous forlorn clown Emmet Kelly, after which “Haven’t Got the Blues (Yet)” became the title track. Another standout track, “Depression Blues,” invokes such great blues men as Blind Lemon Jefferson and Sleepy John Estes, not to mention Shakespeare and “old Sigmund.”

Producing HGTB(Y) was Wainwright’s long time musical collaborator David Mansfield, who has backed him on numerous previous recordings as instrumentalist/arranger, including the 2010 Grammy Award winning High Wide & Handsome-The Charlie Poole Project.

“I got to know L’il Davey about 23 years ago, on a flight back from Vancouver—I think—to New York,” Wainwright recalls. “I’ve worked on and off with him ever since, on TV, in the recording studio, and on the road. He’s been featured as a player and arranger on some of my best records including History, Grown Man, Last Man on Earth, and High Wide & Handsome.”

Other top players grace HGTB(Y), and include ace banjoist Tony Trischka, saxophonist Steve Elson, drummer Sammy Merendino, bassist Tim Luntzel, and another longtime musical cohort, Chaim Tannenbaum, on background vocals.

Born in Chapel Hill, N.C. in 1946, Loudon Wainwright III came to fame when “Dead Skunk” became a Top 20 hit in 1972. He had studied acting at Carnegie-Mellon University, but dropped out to partake in the “Summer of Love” in San Francisco, and wrote his first song in 1968 (“Edgar,” about a lobsterman in Rhode Island).

He was soon signed to Atlantic Records by Nesuhi Ertegun, and was lured by Clive Davis to Columbia Records, which released “Dead Skunk.” His songs have since been recorded by Bonnie Raitt, Johnny Cash, Earl Scruggs, Kate & Anna McGarrigle, his son Rufus Wainwright, and Mose Allison, among others. In 2011, they were commemorated by the comprehensive five-disc retrospective 40 Odd Years.

Additionally, Wainwright has co-written with songwriter/producer Joe Henry on the music for Judd Apatow’s hit movie Knocked Up, written music for the British theatrical adaptation of the Carl Hiaasen novel Lucky You, and composed topical songs for NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered and ABC’s Nightline. An accomplished actor, he has appeared in films directed by Martin Scorsese, Hal Ashby, Christopher Guest, Tim Burton, Cameron Crowe, Judd Apatow, and Steven Soderbergh.

Wainwright has also starred on TV in M.A.S.H. and Undeclared, and on Broadway in Pump Boys and Dinettes. Most recently, he appeared in Soderbergh’s film Mosaic, and has been performing a one-man theatrical show, Surviving Twin, which combines his songs and the writings of his late father: Initially developed as part of University of North Carolina's Playmakers series, Surviving Twin focuses on fatherhood—both being a father and having one—and also explores the issues of birth, self-identity, loss, mortality, fashion, and of course, pet ownership.
Lucy Wainwright Roche
“[Lucy Wainwright Roche's] clear, steady voice feels like a beacon of sorts, slicing straight through the room” - The New York Times

“Sincere and raw...Roche’s bittersweet voice leaps out; she paints an indelible image” - NPR


Lucy Wainwright Roche
There’s A Last Time For Everything

Set out to explore indie singer-songwriter Lucy Wainwright Roche, and you'll discover her unforgettable voice, smart, arresting songwriting, and her stellar stage presence. If you dig a little deeper, you'll find an artist with a colorful musical pedigree who is expanding her sound with an ambitious new recording, There’s A Last Time For Everything. Lucy Wainwright Roche is hell-bent on creating a meaningful career in this post-music business era.

Born into a musical family in Greenwich Village, NYC, Lucy Wainwright Roche is deeply steeped in the musical world. In addition to her parents (Loudon Wainwright III and Suzzy Roche of The Roches) and her siblings, (Martha and Rufus Wainwright), Lucy's various aunts, uncles and cousins are all musicians. After a childhood of touring in vans and hanging out backstage at clubs and theaters around the country, Lucy went off to college and grad school –– a twist on the classic rebellion –– and became a school teacher in NYC. In 2005, on a whim, she spent a few weeks out on the road with her brother Rufus, which in turn reignited her deep connection to life on the road. Shortly after, Lucy left her teaching job to pursue music full time.

Fast forward to 2013. With two EPs (8 Songs and 8 More) and one full-length album entitled Lucy (2010) under her belt, she’s traveled thousands of miles, and armed with a just a guitar and a huge angelic voice, she’s performed solo and with countless musicians from Neko Case to the Indigo Girls in the United States and abroad.

There's a Last Time For Everything was recorded in Nashville with her friend, collaborator and producer, Jordan Brooke Hamlin. Hamlin and Roche worked together to create a dreamy landscape for the album's 11 tracks. Lucy's distinct voice and dead-on songwriting serve as the centerpiece of this rich tapestry. After 10 days in the studio, the entire album was recorded and ready for post-production.

"Jordan and I crafted these tracks over long summer days that stretched into late, late nights," says Roche. "We were gloriously swept up in the process, like kids working on a secret project. Because we were working with a limited time frame, we went with out gut on every decision. There wasn't time for us to second guess or retrace our steps. The urgency of working that way was exciting and freeing - and also a little bit terrifying”
– LWR

There's A Last Time For Everything includes musical performances from an array of musicians from Chris Donahue (Emmylou Harris, Collective Soul) to Allison Miller (Brandi Carlile, Natalie Merchant) as well as several appearances by guest singers who hail from various ends of the troubadour world.
Colin Meloy (The Decemberists) adds harmonies to "Seek And Hide," which Lucy wrote while watching a man walk up and down the block outside of her building one afternoon, and is the album's upbeat and fleshed out second track.

Roche recalls, "It was a song that I wrote kind of mysteriously - and about a stranger. I knew that I wanted a male voice that was very distinctive to join me on that song. My very first choice was Colin and although I don't know him well, he graciously agreed to sing on the track and really hit the nail on the head and added just the touch I was hoping for."

The album also includes a precise and expertly executed harmony part sung by Mary Chapin Carpenter on the lilting duet, "A Quiet Line.” Both Lucy and Mary get to demonstrate their gift for harmony singing on this track.

Robby Hecht lends his soulful, meditative voice to the final track on the album, "Under The Gun." Also featured on this track, is a mournful clarinet line played by producer Jordan Hamlin.

The song "Last Time" (from which the album gets it's title) is an exploration of the way a relationship changes over time, and the pain and resignation that go hand in hand with those changes. In it's sadness, the track has a playful quality to it

"We had fun building the track for that one - we recorded zippers zipping, spoons clanging, empty yogurt containers filled with beans shaking, anything we could find. We liked the idea of cobbling together the percussion from various objects around us."

There is one cover song on the record: a reinvention of Robyn's dance hit "Call Your Girlfriend.” Roche and Hamlin’s version is stripped down to voice and guitar and fleshed out with harmonies, making it strikingly different from the original.

After the whirlwind recording process, a couple of weeks were spent in post production where Hamlin and Roche continued to fine tune the tracks with the help of additional recording and mixing by Grammy winning Producer Stewart Lerman, who also recorded and produced Lucy's first three recordings. Joshua Moore handled editing and mixing.

"By the end of recording, I was sitting there with 11 tracks that I really loved and I need ask myself, 'How am I going to get this record heard'?

Knowing that she would be working without a record label, Lucy set out to find a way to finance the album and publicize it.

"I thought a lot about doing a kickstarter campaign to raise the funds but I worried that people are burnt out from all the fundraising that’s going on these days. I was interested in finding a slightly different approach."

In the end, Lucy decided on two strategies. The first, to offer the record for pre-order and include a few previously unreleased duets recorded by Lucy and her mother Suzzy. In the process of recording these extra tracks, the pair decided to continue recording an entire album, Fairytale and Myth, collaboration with the late great Rob Morsberger.

"It's amazing how having to think on your feet about funding one record can result in an entirely different recording coming to life."

Roche's second fundraising strategy was to offer house concerts – shows in private homes. The idea has proved very successful and has enabled Lucy to raise money for promotion and production.

"It's a great way to get to know your fans better," she says. "A real point of connection, because you're entering into their world and both parties are taking a chance, not totally sure how it will turn out. It's been a thoroughly rewarding way to raise money and it feels like a very equal exchange, which is something I like about it."
Venue Information:
World Cafe Live Philadelphia
3025 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19104
http://philly.worldcafelive.com/