Bombadil / Goodnight, Texas – Tickets – World Cafe Live Philadelphia – Upstairs – Philadelphia, PA – December 8th, 2016

Bombadil / Goodnight, Texas

Bombadil / Goodnight, Texas

Angelica Garcia

Thu · December 8, 2016

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

World Cafe Live Philadelphia - Upstairs

$13 ADV - $15 DOS + Fees

Bombadil
Bombadil
"The melodies are chipper, the hooks prominent, the performances energetic, and the arrangements full to bursting with ideas" – Paste Magazine

“bursting with irresistible melodies, unexpected lyrical gems, and moments of profound honesty, all anchored by expert songwriting skills" – Time Out New York

Durham, North Carolina-based trio Bombadil hit the road this December to showcase their ambitious blend of folk-pop, previewing brand new songs from their new album to be released March 2017 on Ramseur Records, produced and engineered by John Vanderslice (Death Cab for Cutie, The Mountain Goats, St. Vincent, Spoon). Over the past decade, the band – Daniel Michalak (piano, guitar, vocals), James Phillips (percussion, vocals), and newest member Stacy Harden (bass, guitar, vocals) – have built a steady following, earning the support of media outlets including The New York Times and NPR. Called “multi-textured, wildly inventive, eclectic, and hugely enjoyable,” Bombadil write songs featuring infectious melodies and lush vocal harmonies, telling stories of love and the curiosities of life.

Dolph Ramseur, head of Ramseur Records/Management, discovered Bombadil on the band’s MySpace page, subsequently catching their live show and signing them in 2006. Ramseur, who also steers the career of The Avett Brothers, helped the group book tours and release records to critical acclaim, including the Bombadil EP (2006); A Buzz, A Buzz (2008); and Tarpits and Canyonlands (2009). Just prior to the release of Tarpits and Canyonlands, Michalak was diagnosed with neural tension, and consequently Bombadil could not tour in support of the record. Bombadil took a hiatus, and after several years of therapy, Michalak was able to return. The band regrouped in North Carolina in 2013, releasing Metrics of Affection that same year and Hold On in 2015.
Goodnight, Texas
Goodnight, Texas
If you take out a map and measure the midway point between San Francisco and Chapel Hill, North Carolina — the homes of songwriters Avi Vinocur and Patrick Dyer Wolf, respectively — you’ll find an unincorporated town called Goodnight, Texas (population at last count: 28). That’s what the duo discovered when they went looking for the center of their long-distance collaboration, a musical project that sounds, appropriately enough, like a cross-country drive on Interstate 40: Expansive, full of possibility, American in every sense of the word — the perfect place for missing someone but regretting nothing, for losing yourself in the crackle of guitar through speakers and having a good long think.

After meeting in San Francisco in 2007, Vinocur and Wolf built a friendship based on trading words and tunes. “I had never been able to sing with anyone before Pat. I was terrible at it,” says Vinocur. “But I didn't even have to try to harmonize with him. I still sort of have a hard time believing how easy it still is.” When Wolf moved to North Carolina in 2009, the songwriters kept in touch, finding their stylistic midpoint amidst banjo, guitar and mandolin, a love of working-class anthems. Though the two singers have notably different styles — Wolf showcasing a lifelong love of acoustic folk; Vinocur clearly comes from the world of garage rock, and leans toward darker blues — the duo shared a mutual admiration and easy harmony, as well as a fascination with late 19th century small-town America: A vision of a grittier, simpler world, full of raw pain and mysterious beauty. In 2012, after picking up a rhythm section (Alex Nash and Scott G. Padden), Goodnight, Texas released their debut LP, A Long Life of Living, to much critical acclaim.

The band’s contagiously entertaining dynamic at live shows, as well as the album’s energy, soul and range — from red-blooded, foot-stomping rock ’n’ roll to wistful front porch ballads to haunting tales of doomed romance — has made devotees out of both music critics and a growing legion of fans spread out across the country. Goodnight, Texas spent the last year and a half out on the road, supporting acts like Shakey Graves and Rusted Root, in addition to playing two sold-out hometown shows at the Fillmore alongside Bombay Bicycle Club and Nicki Bluhm and the Gramblers. The band released their sophomore record, Uncle John Farquhar, in the summer of 2014.

“It's a more upbeat, a little more fun, but it's still got some heaviness,” says Wolf of the new record. “The highs are higher and the lows are lower.” Vinocur, in particular, is excited to release “Dearest Sarah,” based on an actual Civil War letter written from husband to wife in 1861, a song Vinocur’s been working at for nearly eight years. “I wrote it in 2006 as a 4/4 acoustic guitar song and played it at two shows before taking it out of my set list.” says Vinocur “It was a lot of lyrics to remember and I was worried I would mess them up and ruin the song's impact. I knew it was a significant song to me, but it wasn't quite right yet.” Vinocur says the song was “all but forgotten until I re-watched Ken Burns’ Civil War where Sullivan Ballou's letter is read. Very shortly thereafter, on a particularly lonely trip to New Zealand in 2012, I re-learned it on a rooftop in Auckland and switched it to mandolin and waltz time. I added the bridge riff and the whole vibe came together. Finally I felt it was done and we recorded for release on our new record, 8 years after I first wrote it.“

The album itself is named for Wolf’s great-great-great grandfather, and a sermon he delivered on the occasion of Abraham Lincoln’s death graces the record’s liner notes. “In my eyes, he serves as kind of the first entry in the scrapbook that is this album concept,” says Wolf of the old photo of Farquhar that originally captured his imagination. “I was thinking of the album as a scrapbook - a collection of clippings over the course of the past century and a half,” says Wolf. “The oldest entries of the album package relate to John Farquhar, who was my maternal great-great-great grandfather, a minister in Lancaster PA: the cover of his Abraham Lincoln sermon is the cover of the liner notes booklet. Inside the booklet a letter that he wrote to his cousin in Massachusetts during the Civil War after visiting makeshift hospitals right outside the battle of Gettysburg. These documents are sort of the anchor of the work, so we've got this familial link to a seminal point in America's history and an example of both his (John Farquhar’s) public and private voices.“

Americana is arguably an overused term at the moment — but what sets Goodnight, Texas apart from the pack is its richly imagined, full-color stories. In the longstanding folk tradition of Bob Dylan, Woody Guthrie and Johnny Cash, Goodnight, Texas sings songs that are each a world in and of themselves — transporting listeners from the battlefields of the deep south to a saloon full of hard-drinking but good-natured regulars to the nervous feeling in the stomach of a poor boy about to ask for his girl’s hand in marriage.

Uncle John Farquhar showcases this talent perhaps better than ever, with the two songwriters’ styles playing off each other to great effect, balancing a wry sense of humor with an obvious respect for the ghosts of this country’s past. Whether in Vinocur’s realm of epic sagas of loss and animated hit-the-road tunes or Wolf’s natural gift for deceptively sparse, emotion-driven songwriting, we can feel the sun-baked earth, taste the sweat of a day’s labor, hear the hound dog howling in the yard. Our protagonists are lonely travelers and scorned lovers ad sympathetically conjured bank robbers, and for the duration of a song, we are rooting for them with all we’ve got.
Angelica Garcia
Singer and songwriter Angelica Garcia’s journey “down the rabbit hole” began when she moved to Accomac, Virginia. Graduating from Los Angeles School for the Arts, the 17-year-old native Angeleno found herself living in a 200-year-old gothic brick home encircled by magnolia trees and under a blanket of bright stars. Her stepfather traded a career in the music industry for Episcopalian priesthood, and an Eastern Shore church would serve as his (and the family’s) first congregation. Isolated and alone, Angelica locked herself in the parish house and fashioned a musical world that veers between ghostly gorgeous countrified blues and sly swamp Americana. With a childlike whimsy, quirky sense of humor, and dynamic delivery, it could easily soundtrack an apparitions’ ball in some Faulknerian mansion. Upon first listen, it entranced Warner Bros. Records. Recorded by Charlie Peacock [The Civil Wars, Switchfoot] in Nashville, her full-length debut Medicine For Birds unlocks this world for everyone in 2016.
Venue Information:
World Cafe Live Philadelphia - Upstairs
3025 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA, 19104
http://philly.worldcafelive.com/